Bloomberg’s “Clean Halls”

Matt Taibbi has a stunning report on an NYPD program put in place under Mayor Bloomberg called “Clean Halls,” which extends the already invasive and racist “Stop and Frisk” policy into the hallways of privately owned buildings, with the landlords’ permission.

According to the NYCLU, which filed the suit, “virtually every private apartment building [in the Bronx] is enrolled in the program,” and “in Manhattan alone, there are at least 3,895 Clean Halls Buildings.” Referring to the NYPD’s own data, the complaint says police conducted 240,000 “vertical patrols” in the year 2003 alone.

If you live in a Clean Halls building, you can’t even go out to take out the trash without carrying an ID – and even that might not be enough. If you go out for any reason, there may be police in the hallways, demanding that you explain yourself, and insisting, in brazenly illegal and unconstitutional fashion, on searches of your person.

Not surprisingly, Taibbi is able to identify the massive element of class warfare inherent in this sort of program emerging in our epoch of financial lawlessness:

Stories like this “Clean Halls” program are beginning to make me see that journalists like myself have undersold the white-collar corruption story in recent years by ignoring its flip side. We have two definitely connected phenomena, often treated as separate and unconnected: a growing lawlessness in the financial sector, and an expanding, repressive, increasingly lunatic police apparatus trained at the poor, and especially the nonwhite poor.

In recent years, as Wall Street firms turned into veritable felony factories, we had pundits and politicians who cranked out reams of excuses for one white-collar criminal after another and argued, in complete seriousness, that sending a rich banker to jail “wouldn’t solve anything” and in fact we should “tolerate the excesses” of the productive rich, who “channel opportunity” to the rest of us.

On the other hand, we’ve had politicians and pundits in budget fights and other controversies railing against the parasitic poor, who are not only not “productive” enough to warrant a break, but assumed to be actively unproductive (they consume our tax money and public services) and therefore sort of guilty in advance.

This is simply stunning and a stark reminder of how Michael Bloomberg is not the sort of politician any liberal should support. In contrast, he is a hardcore class warrior for for elites and by all appearances, he is winning his war.

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