Broken Convention

Chris Bowers breaks down potential outcomes from Super Tuesday in the Democratic presidential delegate chase and paints a clear picture that shows we’re headed towards an outcome that is determined by super delegates. Then the Clinton campaign confirmed to Matt Stoller that they think this can go to a brokered convention. Then Bowers received further input worthy of reflection on how things could sort out if things remain close between Obama and Clinton.

I’m with Paul Krugman: “I hate this thought.”

I think for somewhat different reasons, though. I hate the horse race, having lived on the tail end of it for much of the last year. But what I hate more is the thought that Democratic primary and caucus goers may not be the final arbiters in choosing our party’s nominee. Super delegates, unelected officials bequeathed with authority for their role in the party structure, could determine the outcome in contravention to the popular vote totals.

This may be how things are always done, but I can’t say the microscope of a brokered convention would reveal particularly democratic tendencies  in the Democratic Party.

I’ve been mulling over a potential alternative system for picking our nominee. I’ll probably post on it after Super Tuesday, but needless to say it will reflect the need for us to evolve a more democratic, more systematic, more national primary system. This kind of nonsense needs to stop after this election.

3 thoughts on “Broken Convention

  1. “Super delegates, unelected officials bequeathed with authority for their role in the party structure, could determine the outcome in contravention to the popular vote totals.”

    I thought the super delegates also include elected Democratic party office holders (Members of Congress, Governors, etc.). Is that not correct?

    Like

  2. Lukeness,
    Yes, some super delegates are current elected officials. But many are also past elected officials who currently hold no office. Others are party officials who were elected by Party members, but not the voting public.

    The concept of a super delegate, at base, is an anti-democratic one. It is built on the notion that some special people should be given far greater say in the process than the general public.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s